Humanities in Climate Change

PLAN-IT CHANGE IO

The idea is to get people together in their own communities and form groups. Those groups can meet in person or online. Or a combo of the two. A bit like the structure of AA for physical meetings.

The idea is to get people to discuss their fears and have artists and other communicators put that into art of succinct messaging and use it online and in the real world. Anything from videos to street art. Think Banksy but instead of one guy it’s a massive group and hopefully out of that we can choose some art that will have an impact and spread it.

Studies have shown people shut down when they learn about climate change, the idea is to get those people together, to discuss their fears, to get them to motivate each other and know they are not alone. At the same time, artists, propagandists, and messengers listen and hopefully are inspired to make concise and direct art/messages that can be plastered everywhere to make the politicians aware of the reality of what our kids are feeling.

We can also coordinate mass social media messaging. For example, thousands of teenagers sending a 30 second video of their greatest fear about climate change to a specific politician at the same time. One day we all slap a symbol on every gas pump city in the world. Things of that nature.

DOES ACTIVIST ART HAVE THE CAPACITY TO RAISE AWARENESS IN AUDIENCES?—A STUDY ON CLIMATE CHANGE ART AT THE ARTCOP21 EVENT IN PARIS.

The goal of this study was to investigate whether activist art can have a stimulating psychological effect on its spectators. This question is examined in art specifically related to climate change. With the aim of inspiring public engagement and communicating environmental issues to spark a climate change movement, ArtCOP21 is a global festival that took place simultaneously to the United Nations climate change negotiations (Conference of the Parties [COP21]) 2015 in Paris. Eight hundred seventy-four spectators responded to a questionnaire on their perception of 37 selected artworks. In an explorative study using cluster analysis, characteristics of the artworks were connected with emotional and cognitive audience responses. The analysis of the artworks assigned them to four clusters: “the comforting utopia,” “the challenging dystopia,” “the mediocre mythology,” and “the awesome solution.” As suggested by the name, the “awesome solution” was the cluster of artworks that caused the highest emotional and cognitive activation. Artists and environmental campaigners can use the commonalities of the artworks in this cluster in their own creative work and contribute to our understanding of the impact of activist art. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)

SUSTAINABILITY IN AN IMAGINARY WORLD

Sustainability in an Imaginary World is a research project attempting to integrate scenario analysis and the arts as a means of exploring less obvious layers of sustainability. The project ran for three years thanks to a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and involved two mountings of a fully immersive and interactive installation, along with extensive participant interviews and an online version of the experiences. The project led to abundant conversation on diverse themes: deepening scenario engagement experiences; ‘using’ art or the aesthetic dimension in intentional, prescriptive ways; structuring interdisciplinary research projects; structuring interdisciplinary art projects; incorporating digital interactivity into linear experiences; and, perhaps most importantly, the very nature of sustainability itself.